logo

Pervasive Developmental Disorder (Not Otherwise Specified)

Diagnostic Criteria

ICD

ICD-11

The 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, which is due for publication in 2019, is likely to eliminate pervasive developmental disorder (not otherwise specified) as a formal diagnosis by dissolving it and other subtypes of autism into one diagnosis called autism spectrum disorder.

ICD-10

According to the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems - 10th Edition, 'atypical autism' is

'A type of pervasive developmental disorder that differs from childhood autism either in age of onset or in failing to fulfil all three sets of diagnostic criteria. This subcategory should be used when there is abnormal and impaired development that is present only after age three years, and a lack of sufficient demonstrable abnormalities in one or two of the three areas of psychopathology required for the diagnosis of autism (namely, reciprocal social interactions, communication, and restricted, stereotyped, repetitive behaviour) in spite of characteristic abnormalities in the other area(s). Atypical autism arises most often in profoundly retarded individuals and in individuals with a severe specific developmental disorder of receptive language.'

DSM

DSM-5

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders published in 2013 eliminates pervasive developmental disorder (not otherwise specified) as a formal diagnosis by dissolving it and other subtypes of autism into one diagnosis called autism spectrum disorder . According to the American Psychiatric Association, this represents an effort to more accurately diagnose all individuals showing the signs of autism.

DSM-4

According to the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders people with pervasive developmental disorder (not otherwise specified) share most of the symptoms found in other people with autism.

However individuals with PDD - NOS.

  • do not fully meet the criteria of symptoms used to diagnose any of the three other specific types of autism and/or
  • do not have the degree of impairment described in any of the other kinds of ASD.

Variations

Each individual will experience these symptoms to a different extent. For example, a child may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction. Each child will display communication, social, and behavioral patterns that are individual but fit into the overall diagnosis of autism.

Related Links

 

Updated
27 Jun 2018