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Autistic Disorder

Autistic disorder is a form of autism. It is also known as autism, childhood autism, early infantile autism, Kanner's syndrome or infantile psychosis.

The fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, published in 2013, eliminates autistic disorder as a formal diagnosis by dissolving it and other subtypes of autism into one diagnosis called autism spectrum disorder.

The 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, which is due for publication in 2019, is also likely to eliminate childhood autism as a formal diagnosis by dissolving it and other subtypes of autism into one diagnosis called autism spectrum disorder.

The 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, published in 2010, stated that 'childhood autism' is

'A type of pervasive developmental disorder that is defined by: (a) the presence of abnormal or impaired development that is manifest before the age of three years, and (b) the characteristic type of abnormal functioning in all the three areas of psychopathology: reciprocal social interaction, communication, and restricted, stereotyped, repetitive behaviour. In addition to these specific diagnostic features, a range of other nonspecific problems are common, such as phobias, sleeping and eating disturbances, temper tantrums, and (self-directed) aggression'

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About This Glossary

This glossary is designed to explain some of the jargon and gobbledygook used by some people when they talk about autism or research..

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The fact that an intervention is listed in this glossary does not necessarily mean that we agree with its use. Nor does it necessarily mean that there is any scientifically valid or reliable evidence behind it.