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Brain response to hearing one's own name found to be diminished in adults with autism

Previously, research has shown that children at risk of an autism diagnosis respond less to hearing their own name. Now, a new study from the research group EXPLORA of Ghent University shows for the first time that the brain response to hearing one's own name is also diminished in adults with an autism diagnosis. The study was conducted by Dr. Annabel Nijhof as part of her PhD project, supervised by Prof. Dr. Roeljan Wiersema and Prof. Dr. Marcel Brass.

Whether you are at a party or in line at the supermarket, when you hear someone calling your name this usually elicits a strong orienting response.  Hearing your own name typically signals that another person intends to attract your attention, and orienting to the own name is considered an important aspect of successful social interaction. Problems with social interaction and communication belong to the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Studies with infants at risk for ASD have indicated that a diminished orienting response to the own name is one of the strongest predictors for developing ASD. Surprisingly however, this had not yet been studied in individuals with an ASD diagnosis.


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https://www.news-medical.net/news/20180129/Brain-response-to-hearing-ones-own-name-found-to-be-diminished-in-adults-with-autism.aspx
Date
29th January 2018
Source
News Medical